PARTNERING HEALTH LIMITED (PHL) INFORMATION SHARING PROTOCOL

FAIR PROCESSING NOTICE (Also known as PRIVACY NOTICE)

Reference: http://www.ico.org.uk/for_organisations/data_protection/the_guide/principle_1

  1. The first principle of the Data Protection Act 1998 requires that personal data is
    processed fairly. To meet this requirement PHL have a duty to produce a Fair Processing Notice.
  2.  
    The PHL Fair Processing Notice informs the data subject:

    • The identity of the organisation who controls the data being shared.
    • The reason it is being shared.
    • The Agencies that your information is likely to be shared with, if any.

     
    The organisation providing you with this notice and controlling the data that you have supplied is Partnering Health Limited (PHL).

  3. Personal data is being shared in order to enable:
     

    • Provision of a range of health, development initiatives; education and training opportunities.
    • Carrying out the administration functions of a Health Care Provider.
    • The co-ordination and joint working of partner agencies.
    • Compliance with legal and statutory obligations.

    All participating agencies that your information may be shared with are known to PHL and are regulated health care organisations that will also have their own Fair Processing Notice in place.  All members of staff employed by these agencies are bound by the common law duty of confidentiality which means that information that you provide to us must be held in confidence and not shared with anyone else unless:

    • Partners are legally obliged or permitted to disclose the information to another organisation or person.
    • You provide consent to share the information.
  4. Reasonable steps must be taken to meet service user’s communication needs. With your
    consent, these needs should be shared between partners in data shared as part of integrated, local data sharing processes. Under the Data Protection Act 1998 you have the right to request a copy of your information (for which a fee of £10 may be charged).